Available courses

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and standards underlying financial accounting systems. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including revenue and expense recognition, merchandising activities, inventory, financial assets, long-lived assets, PPE, intangibles and long term liabilities. The course emphasizes the construction of the basic financial accounting statements which are the income statement, balance sheet and cash flow statement, as well as their interpretation.


This course helps students to capitalize on the entrepreneurship way of thinking and approach to initiate and develop new business and venture. Students will also learn to deal with usual matters and threats related to the survival of the new venture and how to successfully grow within the context of very competitive and evolving markets.


This course is an introductory course to entrepreneurship.  It covers topics related to the nature and importance of entrepreneurship, forms of entrepreneurship, the entrepreneurial mind and the entrepreneurial process. It also explains the process of developing successful business ideas including recognizing opportunities and generating ideas, encouraging creativity, conducting feasibility analysis, developing an effective business model, conducting industry and competitor analysis and writing/presenting a business plan.


This self-paced course is aimed primarily at AZMUni staff who are new to Moodle as well as those wishing to brush up on their knowledge.
The course introduces key ideas and tools enabling participants to construct or improve their own Moodle courses

To enrol yourself onto this course, please click on the course title- once on the course page, you will see the option 'Enrol me on this course' on the left of the page.

This is a 3 credit advanced level course that provides more opportunities for overall general language development in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. However, more attention is given to the writing skill with particular focus on producing a documented, argumentative research paper.  The course will build on the skills and the understanding of the academic norms that were fostered in English Communication Skills I and will help learners acquire the skills necessary to produce more extensive analytical and evaluative term papers.


ENGL 201: English Communication Skills I
This is a university requirement course. The use of Moodle will facilitate learners' English language skills

This is a 3 credit course that aims at developing the appropriate linguistic and communicative skills needed to tackle different coursework assignments in English. Through an integrated approach, a wide variety of contemporary reading material, communicative tasks as class discussions and oral presentations, and writing activities, learners will develop not only their respective competences in the four language skills but also their critical thinking and study skills.

This is a 3 credit advanced level course that provides more opportunities for overall general language development in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. However, more attention is given to the writing skill with particular focus on producing a documented, argumentative research paper.  The course will build on the skills and the understanding of the academic norms that were fostered in English Communication Skills I and will help learners acquire the skills necessary to produce more extensive analytical and evaluative term papers.


This course provides a micro-level analysis of behavior of individuals and groups within their organizations, and the influence that the environment has on such behavior patterns. Accordingly, the course helps individuals understand the different roles people play in the firm irrespective of functional affiliation and to gain an appreciation and understanding of the entangled interplay and interactions between people, structure, environment and other organizational dimensions.


Accounting II expands on what the student learns in Accounting I by focusing on corporate accounting. This course discusses how corporations are structured and formed with an emphasis on corporate characteristics. Stocks, bonds, notes, purchase investments and analysis of financial statements are included, as well as an in-depth look at managerial accounting. Statements of cash flow, budgets, and budget management are also examined. Prerequisite: ACCO 202 Financial Accounting I.


This course applies with students the fundamental concepts of creating Building Information Modeling (BIM) through the application of tools in Revit architecture. The Autodesk Revit platform offers a wide range of functionality, and supports a BIM workflow from concept to construction. During this course and by working on and towards a comprehensive design project, students will learn to create an intelligent 3D virtual model that represents building facilities, and to integrate project data across the full range of architectural documents. Furthermore, students will learn to apply a comprehensive set of analysis leading to a more informed and sound design decisions. In the process, students will carry a complete overview of all building parts and building performance on structural, thermal, and lighting levels. By the end of this course, students are expected to understand the core concept of BIM to apply it to their own projects and design practices.
This design studio emphasizes the integrative design of buildings, engaging issues of structure, circulation, program, organization, building systems, materiality, and tectonics. It is an advanced core course with a higher level of complexity to be addressed by students of the fourth academic year- an interdisciplinary exploration [social, cultural, historical, economic, urban, etc.] investigation and research that addresses architecture with its extended urban dimension, responding in particular to the theme of DECAY & ABANDONMENT. The importance of this theme lies in its ubiquitous condition in our urban environment that deserves attention to explore the potentialities of these sites and the subsequent confrontation of architects with and investigative position towards history.
This course is a requirement course for second year architecture and interior design students. The World History of Architecture I is the first in the series of history courses.

Although History is often associated with the notion of time (past, present and future) this course deviates from the chronological traditional time frame, and aims at a THEMATIC categorization of historical architectural artifacts.world History of Architecture I main theme is the concept of DOMUS : HOUSE OF GODS, HOUSE OF HUMAN and HOUSE OF THE DEAD)
The study of history is not aimed at for the “knowledge” of the past as a narration of the history of architecture, nor that of the architects themselves, but rather as an insightful look and a comparative analysis of the various factors and forces that has led to a certain specific solution called ‘TYPE ’.
This course seeks to develop informed intuition for structures by emphasizing underlying concepts and synergy of form and structure and encourage creative design integration. The course also aims to convey engineering concepts for analyzing of basic structures and for an effective communication with engineers. Students will conduct also various design experiments related to the topics that they have learned during lectures. This course is a pre-requisite for course Arch 305 – Structural Mechanics and Analysis.
Design as investigation process: This course is geared for both students of Architecture and Interior Design. Based on the studio format, a sequence of projects is tailored to progressively develop the central skills of observation, research, analytic thinking, and representation, with emphasis on the inventive and intelligent expression of ideas. Students explore ‘ways of seeing’: understanding and interpreting objects/ places/ events from their environment and learning to look beyond the obvious and visible into the unseen and often ‘absurd’ qualities of things.
This course tackles the fundamental laws and principles of physics with emphasis on the application of physical principles to the problems of architecture. It focuses on kinematics, natural laws of motion, rotational motion and torques, static equilibrium and its application to the case of real structures, conservation of momentum and energy, properties of materials, waves and electricity.
This remedial course is aimed at revising and developing basic mathematics skills for architecture students to equip them in understanding structural concepts, complex forms and geometry. This module will cover the fundamental concepts of mathematics that are applicable to architecture and engineering concepts, including: algebra, trigonometry, integration, geometric vectors in three dimensions, matrices, lines and planes, analytic geometry and differential calculus. This course is a pre-requisite to Arch 205 – Statics and Mechanics of Materials.

This course is intended to be used to manage the process of submitting, filtering, selecting business ideas from Azm university students to the Theemar Business Idea Competition

This course offers you some basic software knowledge for new students mainly Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint

ICDL exams in both programs are required and grades will be integrated in the course final grade